“Listening” by Marcus “Goodie” Goodloe

Mar 21

Marcus “Goodie” Goodloe, side effects Campus Pastor, stomach Mosaic South Bay, Redondo Beach, CA writes:

When I ran track in high school, my coach told me time and time again, “Goodie, listen for the starter’s voice (Ok, the word “gun” in my inner city school had other implications. A guy holding a gun in the air, prop or otherwise, never went over well in Compton. So we opted for a person’s voice). But I regress.

I remember one instance at a state-wide final, my senior year. As a hush came over the stadium, the starter’s voice was the focused attention of everyone on the track including people in the stands, coaches on the field, and athletes in the starter’s blocks. The anticipation of movement was thick, my heart pounded, and my hands melted with perspiration. Here it was: the long hours after school in practice, the weight and endurance training, and the rigorous diet came down to this moment. The start of the race, a moment that lasted all of .024 seconds at the most.

In the same way a runner anticipates the voice of the starter, I’m convinced the next step for “party theology,” and those wanting to move intentionally toward making room for others to connect to God and community, is to listen. Listening to God is critical because it allows you to consider how your life can be used as a conduit for His love and compassion. The Scriptures support the importance of listening. The wisest man in all the earth said, “Let the wise listen and add to their learning, and let the discerning get guidance” (Proverbs 1:5). James, a servant of Jesus, called for us to be “quick to listen, slow to speak. . .” (James 1:19).

In very practical ways, you will find there’s a hush in the hearts of those who want more to life than what they are currently experiencing. And so, you must listen to those around you who are disconnected from God and community. I’m convinced you need to listen to hear their heart, not simply their words. Listening involves taking note of other’s fear, pain, past failures, and negative perceptions about God and communities of faith. These feelings are real, but so too is the compassion of God expressed through Jesus. Hearing from those you desire to connect to God and community will give you a sense of interests, circumstances and environments that may be conducive for growth, learning, and character development. Have the audacity to believe that a person’s encounter with Jesus, in the context of community, is the most significant life altering experience on planet earth. An experience not based on opinion or previously held beliefs, but a result of a personal divine connection to the Transcendent.

Here are some practical steps for Parties or experiences, on behalf of Jesus:

1. Book club conversation: identify an engaging book, like Peppermint Filled Piñatas (2007; I know, smooth product placement) and create a series of discussion questions, and action steps around the theme of the book.
2. Music listening parties: team up with friends who are part of a local band, and have a listening party (album release). Discuss how this genre of art is one of many we experience in our community and that “creativity is a natural result of our spirituality.”
3. Service parties: team up with a group of folks and go serve those who are in need. Homeless shelters, soup kitchens, Boys and Girls Clubs, or At-Risk teen programs are nearby in most major cities. Go, and partner with them
4. Commit to follow up conversations after the experiences you’ve created: This includes conversations with your team or family who help plan, and with those who participated.
5. Speaking of planning, look for an opportunity to create “parties” with those who will be impacted the most: Yes, that’s right! Include others (and their friends) in creating an experience they would enjoy. Your mission then, is to find the coolest and most connected person, and launch them into the glare of “streamers” and “party savers.”
6. Conduct an audit of resources you have at your disposal. Some of the experiences need not be expensive, but they should have value and quality. Money makes a difference, but having relationships with people who can come alongside you to make experiences happen is even more important.

“Listening” by Marcus “Goodie” Goodloe

Aug 02

Marcus “Goodie” Goodloe, medical Campus Pastor, more about Mosaic South Bay, purchase Redondo Beach, CA writes:

When I ran track in high school, my coach told me time and time again, “Goodie, listen for the starter’s voice (Ok, the word “gun” in my inner city school had other implications. A guy holding a gun in the air, prop or otherwise, never went over well in Compton. So we opted for a person’s voice). But I regress.

I remember one instance at a state-wide final, my senior year. As a hush came over the stadium, the starter’s voice was the focused attention of everyone on the track including people in the stands, coaches on the field, and athletes in the starter’s blocks. The anticipation of movement was thick, my heart pounded, and my hands melted with perspiration. Here it was: the long hours after school in practice, the weight and endurance training, and the rigorous diet came down to this moment. The start of the race, a moment that lasted all of .024 seconds at the most.

In the same way a runner anticipates the voice of the starter, I’m convinced the next step for “party theology,” and those wanting to move intentionally toward making room for others to connect to God and community, is to listen. Listening to God is critical because it allows you to consider how your life can be used as a conduit for His love and compassion. The Scriptures support the importance of listening. The wisest man in all the earth said, “Let the wise listen and add to their learning, and let the discerning get guidance” (Proverbs 1:5). James, a servant of Jesus, called for us to be “quick to listen, slow to speak. . .” (James 1:19).

In very practical ways, you will find there’s a hush in the hearts of those who want more to life than what they are currently experiencing. And so, you must listen to those around you who are disconnected from God and community. I’m convinced you need to listen to hear their heart, not simply their words. Listening involves taking note of other’s fear, pain, past failures, and negative perceptions about God and communities of faith. These feelings are real, but so too is the compassion of God expressed through Jesus. Hearing from those you desire to connect to God and community will give you a sense of interests, circumstances and environments that may be conducive for growth, learning, and character development. Have the audacity to believe that a person’s encounter with Jesus, in the context of community, is the most significant life altering experience on planet earth. An experience not based on opinion or previously held beliefs, but a result of a personal divine connection to the Transcendent.

Here are some practical steps for Parties or experiences, on behalf of Jesus:

1. Book club conversation: identify an engaging book, like Peppermint Filled Piñatas (2007; I know, smooth product placement) and create a series of discussion questions, and action steps around the theme of the book.
2. Music listening parties: team up with friends who are part of a local band, and have a listening party (album release). Discuss how this genre of art is one of many we experience in our community and that “creativity is a natural result of our spirituality.”
3. Service parties: team up with a group of folks and go serve those who are in need. Homeless shelters, soup kitchens, Boys and Girls Clubs, or At-Risk teen programs are nearby in most major cities. Go, and partner with them
4. Commit to follow up conversations after the experiences you’ve created: This includes conversations with your team or family who help plan, and with those who participated.
5. Speaking of planning, look for an opportunity to create “parties” with those who will be impacted the most: Yes, that’s right! Include others (and their friends) in creating an experience they would enjoy. Your mission then, is to find the coolest and most connected person, and launch them into the glare of “streamers” and “party savers.”
6. Conduct an audit of resources you have at your disposal. Some of the experiences need not be expensive, but they should have value and quality. Money makes a difference, but having relationships with people who can come alongside you to make experiences happen is even more important.